The Marshall Manne Schulman Competition for Student Papers in Criminal Law and/or Criminal Procedure

The Criminal Law Section of the State Bar of California is pleased to announce the 2016-2017 Marshall M. Schulman Annual Competition for Student Papers in Criminal Law and/or Criminal Procedure.  This is a nationwide competition; while the focus is on California law, past winners have included students attending schools across the country.

Deadline

Your entry must be received by email no later than February 28, 2017.

Prizes

Grand Prize

  • $1500 cash prize
  • The Grand Prize –winning paper will be published in the Criminal Law Journal, the official quarterly publication of the Criminal Law Section of the State Bar of California
  • One-year student membership in the Criminal Law Section

Three Honorable Mention Prizes

  • $500 cash prize
  • Each of the papers awarded Honorable Mention status will be published in the Criminal Law Journal, the official quarterly publication of the Criminal Law Section of the State Bar of California
  • One-year student membership in the Criminal Law Section

Eligibility

To be eligible for consideration, the paper must be written solely by a student enrolled in law school at the time the author submits a paper to this Competition.

Contest Rules

The paper must pertain to criminal law and/or to criminal procedure, with a particular focus on contemporary issues of concern in the State of California.  The paper should be original and scholarly.  It should be appropriately and carefully annotated to reflect the authorities that support the author’s opinions and findings, and upon which the author otherwise relies.
 
Papers should be between 1,500 and 4,500 words in length, including any citations, and should follow the citation style of The Blue Book: A Uniform System of Citation.  Papers that have previously been published in a book, journal, magazine, or newspaper are not eligible.
 
Papers submitted to the Competition must be in Word format and sent by e-mail attachment to each of the following Criminal Law Journal co-editors: 

Anne Perry (anne.perry2@usdoj.gov);
Lani Biafore (lanibiafore@gmail.com)

Papers submitted to the 2016-2017 Criminal Law Section Student Paper Competition must be e-mailed no later than midnight, February 28, 2017.  Submissions must be accompanied by an e-mail cover letter verifying the author’s current law school enrollment and authorizing the Criminal Law Section of the State Bar to publish the paper in the Criminal Law Journal.

Judging

The papers will be judged by members of the Criminal Law Executive Committee, who will evaluate the papers on their originality and informational value, as well as the quality of the author’s legal research, writing and analysis.  The decision of the judges is final.  Papers must be of publishable quality, and the Criminal Law Section reserves the right not to award one or more of the listed prizes, if, in the sole opinion of the judges, the papers submitted in the Competition do not meet its standards.

The Criminal Law Section reserves the right to edit the papers that are selected for publication.

For information about the Criminal Law Section see: http://criminallaw.calbar.ca.gov

Marshall Schulman

Marshall Shulman first started practicing law in 1953 after graduating from Loyola Law School. He began working as a prosecutor for the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office in 1956. As a prosecutor, Marshall handled several high profile cases, including prosecution of the “Onion Field” murder case. After nearly 10 years of service as a prosecutor, Marshall left the office to begin a successful criminal defense practice in Santa Ana. In 2002, Marshall moved his practice to San Francisco, a location closer to his wife’s family. He served for many years as a member and then advisor of the Executive Committee of the State Bar Criminal Law Section. He states that what he liked most about his service on the Committee was “the camaraderie between the defense lawyers and prosecutors.” Marshall was instrumental in implementing the policy of balancing defense and prosecution members on the Committee. In addition to his service to the Criminal Law Section, Marshall was a past President of the Orange County chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates, was elected into the American College of Trial Attorneys and the American Board of Criminal Lawyers, and was one of the founders of California Attorneys for Criminal Justice. He was instrumental in developing the State Bar Criminal Law Specialization program. When asked to sum up his thoughts about the practice of criminal law, Marshall stated, “it is the most challenging, interesting, and rewarding area of the practice of law. I enjoy my colleagues and my opponents. I find that it is a highly ethical practice, which is surprising to most people. I am going to miss it terribly.”

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